I’ve written several posts over the past two months about the Galaxy Note 7 battery fires that led Samsung to remove it from the market. In my prior post, I reported, from a Wall Street Journal article, that “investors have shaved off roughly $20 billion in Samsung’s market value. The company has said the recall would cost it $5 billion or more, including lost sales.” The big question now is

It’s been a rough month for Li-ion smartphone batteries. I’ve chronicled the unfortunate events Samsung has experienced with its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone in prior posts: Samsung is Just the Latest and The Cost of Battery Failure. The October 24 issue of The Wall Street Journal provides the latest update in its article, “The Fatal Mistake That Doomed Samsung’s Galaxy Note.” Fear: Samsung Incident Triggers a Wide-Ranging Inquiry into Li-ion

I’m going to deviate from the series I began with my last post to address the timely topic of battery safety. I’ll return to why it’s taking so long to build a better battery next week. Last week Consumer Reports published an online article about Samsung Note 7 smartphones catching fire while charging. Over the Labor Day weekend, major media, including The Wall Street Journal, reported that “Samsung Electronics is

In June, I posted a series of three perspectives on the future of the smartwatch. While each has a slightly different viewpoint, they all agree that the smartwatch has to untether from the smartphone to fully realize its potential and accelerate market adoption. The second post in the series, A GREAT LEAP FORWARD: Don’t Leave Home Without It, focused on the future of the Apple Watch. It noted that the

The previous post, LI-ION BATTERY MARKET: 2015 – 2025 Projections, included a graph from the Avicenne Energy report, “The Worldwide Rechargeable Battery Market.” The graph showed that Li-ion battery use for portable devices is expected to double between 2015 and 2025. An important factor will be the growth of wearable devices. IDTechEx is an analyst and consulting firm that conducts detailed examinations of emerging technologies based on extensive primary research.

As I noted in the previous blog post, LI-ION BATTERY MARKET: 1995–2015 Growth and Drivers, Avicenne Energy, a market research and consulting firm, publishes a comprehensive report each year, “The Worldwide Rechargeable Battery Market.” The graph shows the actual growth of Li-ion battery use for portable electronics and electric vehicles since 2000, and the projected growth through 2025. The Rechargeable Battery Market (source: Avicenne Energy) Between 2000 and 2015, the

Avicenne Energy is a market research and consulting firm that has established a well-regarded reputation for coverage of the battery market. Each year Avicenne publishes a comprehensive report, “The Worldwide Rechargeable Battery Market.” The Avicenne graph below shows how Li-ion battery market size and share grew from 1995 through 2015. An earlier post, LI-ION BATTERY PRODUCTION, described how Sony commercialized the first lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery in 1991 to help drive

Mark Sullivan’s March 10, 2016 Fast Company article, “Apple Watch 2: How the World’s Best Smartwatch Might Makes Its Great Leap Forward,” takes a stab at answering two questions: How will the Apple Watch 2 be better than the first Watch? What will Apple add to the device to make it more useful and necessary to more people? First, Apple is expected to address shortcomings of its initial smartwatch, which

I recently attended a Gartner webinar and read articles in Business Insider and Fast Company that contemplate the future of the smartwatch. While each presents a slightly different perspective, they all agree that the smartwatch has to untether from the smartphone to fully realize its potential and accelerate market adoption. The Gartner webinar, presented on March 15, 2016, is titled “Wearables at the Peak of Inflated Expectations: Myths and Realities.”